In Pictures: Las Vegas’ Neon Museum

Have you noticed that neon lights are disappearing from our cities? Those giant flashing lights you see in places like Times Square are produced nowadays by LED, not the sliced and twisted gas-filled tubes of years ago.

For years, the old, disused neon lights of Las Vegas lay abandoned in an old YESCO production lot, known as the “Neon Boneyard. The Neon Museum of Las Vegas is restoring those signs and, last year, opened up its headquarters in the lobby of La Concha Hotel to offer hour-long tours of its collection.

Sassy Saloon

Sassy Saloon

Lido

Lido

The Stardust sign's font is "Atomic" embracing the spirit of the age, it was meant to resemble the mushroom cloud of atomic tests.

The Stardust

The Stardust sign’s font is “Atomic.” Embracing the spirit of the age, it was meant to resemble the mushroom cloud of atomic tests.

Gamble!

Gamble!

Moulin Rouge

Moulin Rouge

The Moulin Rouge was the first Las Vegas casino to integrate, and the “Moulin Rouge Accord” ended segregation in Las Vagas.

The Horseshoe

The Horseshoe

The Horsehoe was the last to integrate.

Las Vegas Club

Las Vegas Club

La Concha

La Concha

Ironically, the Neon Museum’s sign contains no neon; it is all LED.

A-C-E

A-C-E

N is for Neon

N is for Neon

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